Aboard Astraea

Invest in experiences, not things

Fuel Tank Leak

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Airborne has a leaky fuel tank. Natalie and Josh already cleaned up the few gallons of gas that were in the bilge and have the boat aired out. The tank resides under the aft starboard berth. I don’t know if the tank is original, but it is steel and it looks like there has been rusting around the edges that caused the leak. The next step is to cut out an access hole to pull the tank. The cuts shown in green are the best idea now. There’s also dark green strong backs shown that will be added after the new tank is installed to reinforce the cut areas so I can still sleep at night.

Glassed in tank showing leaky area

When good tanks go bad

The next step is to cut out an access hole to pull the tank. The cuts shown in green are the best idea now. There’s also dark green strong backs shown that will be added after the new tank is installed to reinforce the cut areas so I can still sleep at night.

Cutouts for tank removal

The red line shows one possible cutout to remove the tank. The light green lines are where the fiberglass will be cut. Dark green lines represent the strongbacks that will support the berth after the new tank is installed.

After the fiberglass over the tank is cut and the fiberglass securing the tank to the hull is removed the new tank can go in. It looks like a new custom tank will have to be made out of metal or an existing tank made of plastic will have to be modified to fit in the space. A new tank from Catalina will cost over $500 plus shipping and handling. I’d rather pay a local to make the tank than get one shipped up from California for that price. I’m still on deployment so thanks to Josh for starting the project.

Here are more pictures:

View down at the aft starboard berthwith covers removed

View from midships looking aft of the motor and tank

Crud inside the tank. I guess it was time for replacement anyway.

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